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Discussion Starter #1
will it hurt to run a b7es?
thanks-mokas-
 

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b7es is a hotter heat range, but physically it does interchange............ stick with the stock heat range(b8es or br8es) unless whomever built your engine specified a different plug
 

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A hotter plug is more for slower riding, and it won't foul as much going slower. But the b8es and br8es would seem faster than the 7. I mean maybe I'm totally wrong, but with my kx80 the br9es was alot snappier than the br8es. :shrug:
 

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B8ES has a resistor. The BR8es doesn't. I guess it just lessens the electricity interferring
 

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SheRides721 said:
Crazed said:
SheRides721 said:
B8ES has a resistor. The BR8es doesn't. I guess it just lessens the electricity interferring
Do you have that backwards? I'd assume the R means resister.
Possibly :lol:
yea, r means resistor. a good reason to use the resistor plugs is because lets say someone is watching tv in your house on a local channel. well sometimes if your driving around with the B8ES plug in, you can interfere with the station and fuck up the channels reception. this might also be the same with radio stations.

with the mods listed in my signature, would it be bad to use a BR9ES plug?
 

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punk_rocker128 said:
SheRides721 said:
Crazed said:
SheRides721 said:
B8ES has a resistor. The BR8es doesn't. I guess it just lessens the electricity interferring
Do you have that backwards? I'd assume the R means resister.
Possibly :lol:
yea, r means resistor. a good reason to use the resistor plugs is because lets say someone is watching tv in your house on a local channel. well sometimes if your driving around with the B8ES plug in, you can interfere with the station and fuck up the channels reception. this might also be the same with radio stations.

with the mods listed in my signature, would it be bad to use a BR9ES plug?
The higher the number the colder the plug, meaning you can go faster without burning it up. The smaller the number the hotter the plug, meant for slower machines or for slow riding, like trail riding, as it won't foul as quick. So ya, just try it. The worst it will do is foul the plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
well if you let it idle alos it leaves tons of carbon on top of the piston...if you use a 7 (a hotter plug) it will burn more of the gas/oil mixture therefor less carbon buildup...and i think it will also last longer than a 8, an=m i right?
 

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MIKEMOKAS said:
well if you let it idle alos it leaves tons of carbon on top of the piston...if you use a 7 (a hotter plug) it will burn more of the gas/oil mixture therefor less carbon buildup...and i think it will also last longer than a 8, an=m i right?
Exactly! The 7 will burn better at lower RPM's, when you are slow trail riding or whatnot. An 8 will be better for high speeds and high RPM's. Don't try to run too fast on a 7, it'll burn up. I don't see why you would want a 7? Just run an 8 or 9.
 

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lol

running different plugs does not make a machine go faster. where the hell did you hear this from. obviosly from a bad source.......................
 

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Re: lol

G-MAN-1 said:
running different plugs does not make a machine go faster. where the hell did you hear this from. obviosly from a bad source.......................
I don't think they mentioned anything about going faster :wtf: Just higher RPM's and heating
 

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Crazed said:
A hotter plug is more for slower riding, and it won't foul as much going slower. But the b8es and br8es would seem faster than the 7. I mean maybe I'm totally wrong, but with my kx80 the br9es was alot snappier than the br8es. :shrug:
im not 100% sure that it will make a difference, i know a new plug will run better over an old plug.
 

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koby13 said:
Crazed said:
A hotter plug is more for slower riding, and it won't foul as much going slower. But the b8es and br8es would seem faster than the 7. I mean maybe I'm totally wrong, but with my kx80 the br9es was alot snappier than the br8es. :shrug:
im not 100% sure that it will make a difference, i know a new plug will run better over an old plug.
I was basing 'snappier' on my kx80, but it may have just been the fact of the new plug. A colder plug is more efficient for high RPM's and going fast and hard on it, a hotter plug is more for your lowend so you can trail ride and go slower without fouling.
 

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wow, there seems to be alot of mis-information about spark plug heat ranges.

if your plug is too hot you will experiance pre-ignition, or detonation, and you will also experiance overheating. using " too hot" of a plug over time can also warp exhaust valves on a 4 stroke. i know i know, blasters are 2 strokes. but i feel that information is worth sharing.

too cold of a spark plug will give the quad poor drivability. ( bogs, poor throttle response), and you will also foul plugs like crazy.

once you have the correct heat range, deviating from that will not give you any more power up top, or down low, and it sure as hell wont make it feel snappier when the engine is at normal operating temp.
although i can see too hot of a plug seem snappier on a cold engine, but once the engine is up to temp itll run like poo without the highest octane gas available to fight the detonation and pre ignition caused by the extremly hot combustion chamber and the negative electrode of the spark plug.

resistor spark plugs will not cause ANY loss of performance.
all the resistor does it limit the amprage ( or current) going to the spark plugs. the voltage stays the same. the current is not what makes the spark, the voltage is.

as far as a hotter plug " lasting longer" on a slow trail ride, that is more of a band-aid. if your carberator is calibrated ( tuned) correctly you will not have any problems with the normal heat range spark plug in low speed riding.

the reason a hotter plug will " last longer" during slow trail riding is due to the fact that the carb is "fat on the bottom" and the hot plug burns off the excess gas faster than a notmal plug. this is a bandaid to fight poor carb tuning on the bottom.

hope this helps :tup:
 

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NitrousGuy said:
wow, there seems to be alot of mis-information about spark plug heat ranges.

if your plug is too hot you will experiance pre-ignition, or detonation, and you will also experiance overheating. using " too hot" of a plug over time can also warp exhaust valves on a 4 stroke. i know i know, blasters are 2 strokes. but i feel that information is worth sharing.

too cold of a spark plug will give the quad poor drivability. ( bogs, poor throttle response), and you will also foul plugs like crazy.

once you have the correct heat range, deviating from that will not give you any more power up top, or down low, and it sure as hell wont make it feel snappier when the engine is at normal operating temp.
although i can see too hot of a plug seem snappier on a cold engine, but once the engine is up to temp itll run like poo without the highest octane gas available to fight the detonation and pre ignition caused by the extremly hot combustion chamber and the negative electrode of the spark plug.

resistor spark plugs will not cause ANY loss of performance.
all the resistor does it limit the amprage ( or current) going to the spark plugs. the voltage stays the same. the current is not what makes the spark, the voltage is.

as far as a hotter plug " lasting longer" on a slow trail ride, that is more of a band-aid. if your carberator is calibrated ( tuned) correctly you will not have any problems with the normal heat range spark plug in low speed riding.

the reason a hotter plug will " last longer" during slow trail riding is due to the fact that the carb is "fat on the bottom" and the hot plug burns off the excess gas faster than a notmal plug. this is a bandaid to fight poor carb tuning on the bottom.

hope this helps :tup:
:nod:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the only time you should think about running a hotter plug is when the have a high performance motor (i.e. - big bore, exahust, that kinda stuff) so taht the plug is able to burn at those hotter temps.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
thanks alot everyone :tup:
 

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Blastermaster58 said:
NitrousGuy said:
wow, there seems to be alot of mis-information about spark plug heat ranges.

if your plug is too hot you will experiance pre-ignition, or detonation, and you will also experiance overheating. using " too hot" of a plug over time can also warp exhaust valves on a 4 stroke. i know i know, blasters are 2 strokes. but i feel that information is worth sharing.

too cold of a spark plug will give the quad poor drivability. ( bogs, poor throttle response), and you will also foul plugs like crazy.

once you have the correct heat range, deviating from that will not give you any more power up top, or down low, and it sure as hell wont make it feel snappier when the engine is at normal operating temp.
although i can see too hot of a plug seem snappier on a cold engine, but once the engine is up to temp itll run like poo without the highest octane gas available to fight the detonation and pre ignition caused by the extremly hot combustion chamber and the negative electrode of the spark plug.

resistor spark plugs will not cause ANY loss of performance.
all the resistor does it limit the amprage ( or current) going to the spark plugs. the voltage stays the same. the current is not what makes the spark, the voltage is.

as far as a hotter plug " lasting longer" on a slow trail ride, that is more of a band-aid. if your carberator is calibrated ( tuned) correctly you will not have any problems with the normal heat range spark plug in low speed riding.

the reason a hotter plug will " last longer" during slow trail riding is due to the fact that the carb is "fat on the bottom" and the hot plug burns off the excess gas faster than a notmal plug. this is a bandaid to fight poor carb tuning on the bottom.

hope this helps :tup:
:nod:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the only time you should think about running a hotter plug is when the have a high performance motor (i.e. - big bore, exahust, that kinda stuff) so taht the plug is able to burn at those hotter temps.
you would use a colder plug.
remember, all the heat range is is how fast the spark plug can dissapate heat. how quickly the plug can " cool off".

in the case you just mentioned you would use a colder plug because of the higher combustion tempratures related to the higher combustion pressures. your generating more heat, so you want to get rid of
( dissapate) the heat quicker. :tup:
 

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NitrousGuy said:
wow, there seems to be alot of mis-information about spark plug heat ranges.

if your plug is too hot you will experiance pre-ignition, or detonation, and you will also experiance overheating. using " too hot" of a plug over time can also warp exhaust valves on a 4 stroke. i know i know, blasters are 2 strokes. but i feel that information is worth sharing.

too cold of a spark plug will give the quad poor drivability. ( bogs, poor throttle response), and you will also foul plugs like crazy.

once you have the correct heat range, deviating from that will not give you any more power up top, or down low, and it sure as hell wont make it feel snappier when the engine is at normal operating temp.
although i can see too hot of a plug seem snappier on a cold engine, but once the engine is up to temp itll run like poo without the highest octane gas available to fight the detonation and pre ignition caused by the extremly hot combustion chamber and the negative electrode of the spark plug.

resistor spark plugs will not cause ANY loss of performance.
all the resistor does it limit the amprage ( or current) going to the spark plugs. the voltage stays the same. the current is not what makes the spark, the voltage is.

as far as a hotter plug " lasting longer" on a slow trail ride, that is more of a band-aid. if your carberator is calibrated ( tuned) correctly you will not have any problems with the normal heat range spark plug in low speed riding.

the reason a hotter plug will " last longer" during slow trail riding is due to the fact that the carb is "fat on the bottom" and the hot plug burns off the excess gas faster than a notmal plug. this is a bandaid to fight poor carb tuning on the bottom.

hope this helps :tup:
I missed a few things, but that was basically what I was trying to say, but apparently it came out wrong. Sorry if I made any confusion :oops:
 
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