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Discussion Starter #1
how do you put your fronts back in alignment after installing new a-arms and tie rods???desperate for help :???:
 

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Get out the tape measure and hopefully you have a manual for your quad. The manual will tell you the proper proceedure for the setting the proper toe in.

I think normally the toe in is set around 1/8 - 1/4 of an inch, but you better check in the manual.
 

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sheemaster19 said:
how do you put your fronts back in alignment after installing new a-arms and tie rods???desperate for help :???:
Do you have and/or read Dirt Wheels mag?

If so, there is a front end alignment article in the August 2004 on pgs. 186-187
 

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Discussion Starter #4
well I got bad news...I don't have a manual and no I don,t have any of thoughs magazines.So now what do I do?
 

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This should answer all of your questions..........

CAMBER
Camber is the amount of degrees that the tire and wheel is tilted in or out at the top in relation to the bottom of the tire. A tire that is tilted in at the top and out at the bottom is said to have negative camber. The farther it angles out at the bottom the greater the amount of negative camber.

For positive camber, the top of the tire is farther out than the bottom. The reason for having camber in your front end is as follows. An ATV's suspension is forced over in a corner and the suspension flexes. With everything in motion, all this force wants to flex the tire more upright, or reducing the amount of negative camber.

A tire's greatest traction is achieved when more of the tread is in contact with the ground. As the bike enters a corner, the forces tend to bend everything over, adding positive camber. To make sure that the tire's greatest amount of tread is in full contact when it is most needed, we set up the front suspension with a negative camber. How much negative camber you choose depends on the amount of suspension travel, and some various other factors such as the terrain you plan to ride on.

Recommended Camber: Negative

Motocross: 4.5°
Cross Country: 4.5°
Sand Duning: 2 - 4°
Desert Racing: 2 - 4°
Recreational: 1 - 3°



CASTER
Caster is the amount of angle that the spindle has in relation to the vertical centerline of the wheel. If the upper ball joint is farther forward than the lower ball joint, it is said to have negative caster. If the upper ball joint is farther to the back than the lower ball joint, it is said to have positive caster. The greater the amount of positive caster, the more stable the ATV will be at speed. The less positive caster it has, the easier it will steer and the quicker it will turn. As the spindle is laid back, the tire has to lay over more when the front tires are turned. This adds stability. If there is not much angle, the wheel will turn more, making it quicker and easier to turn.

Recommended Caster: Positive

Motocross: 4.5°
Cross Country: 4.5°
Sand Duning: 3 - 4.5°
Desert Racing: 6.5°
Recreational: 3.5 - 4.5°



TOE
The toe of an ATV measures the relation of the leading edge of the front tires to the back of the tires. Toe-out refers to the fact that the front of the tires point out. Toe-in refers to the fact that the front of the tires point in. We recommend you set your toe-in to ¼ of an inch.



HOW TO SET UP YOUR FRONT END
Before you start this procedure, a few things need to be done first. Make sure your work space floor is completely level. You will need a straight edge and an angle finder (available at your local hardware store). Do not attempt to set up your front end on a stand of any kind. Your quad must have the tires on, and be on the ground at ride height.



SETTING THE CASTER
Prior to installing your A-arms, thread the rod ends in all the way on the upper arms. Leave the front rod end alone and back the rearward rod end out (3) complete revolutions. This is a good starting point. Now install your A-Arms. Tighten them completely. Rest the straight edge against the side edge of the upper and lower ball joint threads.(make sure the straight edge is touching the same section of the ball joint threads) If the top of the straight edge leans towards the rear of your quad, you have positive caster. This is what you want. Rest the angle finder on the edge of the straight edge. This will tell you the exact caster setting. You may need to adjust the rod ends by turning one in or out more than the other to get the appropriate setting. Refer to the above recommendations for how much caster to run.




SETTING THE CAMBER
Setting the camber is a much easier process. Rest the straight edge against the outside of your front tire (making sure both wheels are pointing straight and you are touching the same part of the tire, top and bottom). The top of the straight edge should lean inward for negative camber. Now put the angle finder against the straight edge and note the reading. If you need more or less camber, you are going to have to remove one of the ball joints in order to adjust it. First remove the cotter pin and castle nut off of the ball joint, then "smack" the side of the spindle right where the ball joint goes through the spindle to jar the ball joint loose. It will take some pressure to remove it, and it helps if you lift up on the arm itself as your hitting the spindle. For more negative camber, turn the upper ball joint into the a-arm (clockwise). Please Note: Try to keep as many of the threads as possible inside the a-arm. This helps the keep the strength of your front end high. We do not recommend more than 6.5 degrees of negative camber. Now you are almost done!




TOE ADJUSTMENT
For this all you will need is a tape measure. Make sure the handlebars are straight, then make sure both tires are pointing straight forward. To do this, measure from the inside of one tire to a point on the chassis. Make a note of the distance. Then on the other side, measure from the exact same points as you did on the previous side. These measurements need to be exactly the same so that you know your tires are pointed the same. Adjust the tie rods so that this measurement is the same. Now that you're sure the tires are the same distance apart, you need to measure for the toe in. On the front of the tire about half way up, place one end of the tape measure on the inside of the tire and take a measurement from the same point on the other tire. Note this measurement. Then repeat this for the rear of the tire, the same height from the ground as you did on the front, and make a note of this measurement. The front measurement needs to be a ¼ of an inch less than the rear measurement. Adjust the tie rods so that you achieve this measurement. And remember, count how many times you rotate the tie rod, then rotate the other side the same distance, so you can keep the tires going straight ahead, then take your measurements. One full turn on both tie rods will change the toe about 1/8th of an inch. Make sure to completely tighten all nuts and bolts on your new front end, install your cotter pins and GREASE your ball joints!
 
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